Keeping Your Plants Healthy With Sasanqua Saponin


Have you ever struggled with keeping your crops healthy? Are you always finding pests causing decay and destroying your plants?

Tea Seed Saponin is a glycoside compound, extracted from Camellia Tea Seeds and is an excellent, natural, non-ionic, active surfactant. A perfect use for Saponin is as an organic molluscicide for gardening and agriculture.

Insect infestation can seriously affect food production causing up to a 30% loss in product. These pests feed from your plants and other grains creating decay, destroying the plants. Current use of chemical pesticides can help regain control, but these pesticides have been used so commercially that some pests have adapted to the use and can resist the pesticide. Another big problem is that chemical pesticides can be toxic, posing a risk  to the people who work with these chemical and are exposed to them every day. But no worries, we have found the perfect solution!

Each plant has their own way of fighting pests naturally, but with such a large production, we still need something to help them win the fight, so we’ve used the Saponin directly from the plants to help us. 

Sasanqua saponin is a glycoside compound extracted from camellia seeds. This key ingredient is helpful in many ways, but most importantly, it can be used as a natural molluscicide. The compounds  in Saponin have “antimicrobial, antioxidant, insecticidal, nematicidal, and molluscicidal activities”(1)  making it a perfect solution to deter insects from  agriculture. “Saponins directly affect growth and reproduction of insect pests...they increase mortality levels by lowering food intake affecting movement of food  in the insect gut due to toxicity and less digestibility, and  they also exert  strong  insecticidal activity by forming complexes with cholesterol, causing cellular toxicity and ecdysial failure in the insects”(1). These qualities make Saponin a perfect tool against pesticides, ensuring that your plants and crops are pest free and continue to grow.

 

 


References

1. Kaur, Amritpal; Singh, Balwinder (2018). “Control of Insect Pests in Crop Plants and Stored Food Grains Using Plant Saponins: A Review”

 


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